The next Rosetta Stone

Almost all of us know that name. Even people who aren’t learning or have yet to learn a foreign language have likely heard of it. *sigh*The power of marketing and mind control. But this is not the place for that speech, at least not yet.

I’ve disappeared for awhile, because I’m working on the prototype of what I intend to be the next step in language learning software. As a consequence I haven’t had time to write anything of substance. So for now I’ll just make the overly confident statement claiming to have a method that will replace the current mainstream marketed language learning methods. As things progress I’ll be looking for testers, aka people who would like to learn another language for free, more or less. Also, if you’re awesome and would like to be a collaborator, let’s talk.

Now, I should clarify some things. I don’t think I’m all that special of a human being, also I’m not claiming that this software/language learning program will be the only thing someone needs to become fluent in a language, nor am I saying that what’s out there, (Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone to name the two most heard of,) isn’t useful or that it doesn’t produce results. They’re both good, as well as many others, well, I say many others, but I mean, many others exist in varying degrees of usefulness. However, there is one in particular, LingQ(http://www.lingq.com ) that I can’t say is on the incredibly mainstream media circuit, although it certainly deserves to be as it’s possibly one of the best tools out there for improving and learning languages, so if you haven’t checked that one out or heard of it, I highly recommend doing so. It may save your life. You know, you’re being a dorky language learner human life.

But, I am claiming that what I’m working on will have the potential to replace something like Rosetta Stone. And not because it shares any similarities. I think we’ve all had quite enough of, “The ball is red,” or “The child eats the bike,”… maybe that last one’s a bit off, or maybe it’s an improvement. I still think that those of us who have tons of free time and perseverance will almost always be better off making our own self tailored language learning course. But what I’m working on is geared towards:

A.) Giving the people who don’t have the time to learn another language, well, the time to learn another language. As well as some great tools with which to do it.

H.) Helping those self-learners.

and 3.) Having potential classroom application. Since the education system in this country and many other’s could really use a fresh set of eyes.

Anyway, that’s all for now. More to come soon! ^_^

 

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Want to sound like a native?

Sure speaking correctly and understandably is probably more important for someone who’s just beginning their new language acquisition journey, but I’d like to think that everything is equally important.(And I have reasoning to back this up, but you won’t find it here yet.) If you have flawless grammar but speak french with a heavy american accent then, you’ve lost half the battle. I could be wrong, perhaps your goal was to sound like an american speaking French, but then isn’t part of the draw to a new language also the new (sexy)accent?

Many people struggle with this and I know why. Not because I’m all knowing, although I sometimes imagine that I am, but because I’ve gone through it with several languages. Whether or not this will help you in your journey to sound like you’re a native Chinese speaker or whatever language it is that you’re learning, is mostly left up to you, the scientist and experimenter. Here I offer only, the why and some potential how’s to fix this.

The problem:

1)You’re not listening to the sounds of the new language.

2)You’re trying to say words from another language through your own list of pre-ordered language sounds.

Okay, so what does this all mean and how does one fix it?

The solution:
 1) Stop trying to hear language. There is no language. (Remember the Matrix scene with the little bald boy and the spoon? Well he’s right. “There is no spoon.”) What you think is language is really just an agreed upon series and pattern of sounds, which themselves are nothing but varied vibrations that turn into electrochemical impulses in the brain.

The point of all that is, stop listening for words and stop trying to make sense of things, because then it’s as if you have a wooden box with circular and triangular holes, (these holes represent your native language.) Your new language however is made up of Circles, triangles, squares and hexagons. Excuse the rudimentary example but this serves, hopefully, to highlight what so many of us do wrong. We try to fill in the holes with things that don’t fit.

The solution continued:

2) Pretend that you’re listening to music. In the same way that you usually wouldn’t try to hear English words coming from a violin or a drum, you don’t want to try and hear words in a foreign language. Because they’re not going to be words to you for awhile. Try to only hear sounds. Get good at imitating those sounds or parts of those sounds. And one day when the sounds become words you’ll be better able to speak like a native!

 Admittedly, this is more of a teaser article, as I’m deathly sick and can’t talk without coughing, so when I’m better in a few days I’ll probably make a video discussing this in further detail and possibly offering more tips and demonstrations as to how this can work in practice.

As usual feel free to leave electronic words or open a discussion below.